CITIZENSHIP / NATURALIZATION

For those that were not born in the United States, or did not acquire or derive United States citizenship from their parents automatically after birth, United States citizenship may still be available.  Some of the most common ways of obtaining United States citizenship is through, for example, marriage, relative petition or a successful asylum application.  Once you receive your green card you are automatically on a path to United States citizenship.  However, you must fulfill certain requirements prior to applying for citizenship.  Our attorneys are experience in immigration law and will work diligently to investigate the unique facts of your case in an attempt to determine whether you are eligible to apply for United States citizenship. 

Green card holders are eligible to apply for United States citizenship when they meet ALL of the following requirements: 

  • You are at least 18 years of age at the time of filing
  • You have been a green card holder for at least 5 years prior to the date you filed your application for naturalization (N-400);
  • You have lived within the state where you claim residence for at least 3 months prior to filing your application;
  • You demonstrate continuous residence within the United States as a green card holder for at least 5 years from the date of your application;
  • You demonstrate continuous physical presence for five years before filing the application;
  • You demonstrate that you are a person of good moral character;
  • You demonstrate a basic knowledge of United States history and government as well as an ability to read, write, speak, and understand basic English and
  • You take an Oath of Allegiance to the United States.

Spouse of a United States citizen qualifies for naturalization if they:

  • Have been a green card holder for a least 3 years
  • Have been living in “marital union” with the same United States citizen spouse
  • And all other requirements of green card holders (listed above)

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